Was Ist Turf

Was Ist Turf Testen Sie Ihren Wortschatz mit unseren lustigen Bild-Quiz.

Surf and turf oder Surf ’n’ Turf ist ein Hauptgericht, das vor allem in nordamerikanischen Steakhäusern populär ist. Es besteht aus einer Kombination von Meeresfrüchten mit Fleisch, normalerweise die Schwänze von Amerikanischen Hummern oder. Turf (englisch für Torf, Rasen oder Grasnarbe) steht für: Pferdesport, von der englischsprachigen Wortbedeutung übertragen auf Pferderennbahn; Turf. Surf and turf oder Surf 'n' Turf ist ein Hauptgericht, das vor allem in nordamerikanischen Steakhäusern populär ist. Es besteht aus einer Kombination von. Turf T ụ rf 〈 m. -s ; unz. 〉 1. Pferderennbahn 2. Pferderennen 3. 〈 Golf 〉 Rasenfläche der Golfbahn [ engl. Surf and Turf. Bedeutungen: [1] Gericht, bei dem Meeresfrüchte (zum Beispiel Hummer oder Garnelen) mit Fleisch (Steak) kombiniert werden. Herkunft.

Was Ist Turf

Turf T ụ rf 〈 m. -s ; unz. 〉 1. Pferderennbahn 2. Pferderennen 3. 〈 Golf 〉 Rasenfläche der Golfbahn [ engl. For those who can't decide if they prefer beef or fish there are many Surf 'n' Turf variation, e.g. Ranch & Sea" (beef fillet with grilled tiger prawns) or The. Definition, Rechtschreibung, Synonyme und Grammatik von 'Turf' auf Duden online nachschlagen. Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache. Übersetzungen von turf auf Chinesisch traditionell. Wort und Unwort https://appscribe.co/casino-movie-online/beste-spielothek-in-schafstedt-finden.php Jahres in Liechtenstein. Subjekts- und Objektsgenitiv. Such a scheme would save people from being Lottoergebnis out of their houses. Mehr lesen. June 29, If someone turfs out the grit it is not at all clear whether that is an offence. Their managers do not get "turfed out" in the manner in which tenants of public houses. Möchten Sie mehr lernen? Klare Erklärungen von natürlichem geschriebenem und gesprochenem Englisch.

In the early years, various kit designs and colours were used by Burnley. Throughout the first nine years these were various permutations of blue and white, the colours of the club's forerunners Burnley Rovers Rugby Club.

Between and the club used a plain red shirt and from until it changed to an all green shirt with white shorts. The club's committee and manager John Haworth believed it might bring a change of fortune.

The Clarets' first recorded usage of a crest was in December , when they wore the Royal Arms on the shirt.

From , the team played in unadorned shirts, albeit the coat of arms of Burnley was worn in the FA Cup semi-final in and the FA Cup Final.

In , the initials were placed horizontally and were lettered with gold. The club used a new designed badge from , before it returned to the horizontal version of the "BFC" monogram in , which was lettered in white this time.

In , Burnley returned to the crest used from to The latest major change came in To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the —60 First Division title win, Burnley decided to return to the crest used from to The club's current badge is based on the town's coat of arms.

In its mouth it holds the Lacy knot , the badge of the de Lacy family, who held Burnley and Blackburnshire in medieval times.

The stork stands on a hill the Pennines and cotton plants — which represents the cotton making heritage of the town.

In the black band, the hand represents Burnley's motto, "Hold to the Truth", derived from the Towneley family. The two bees refer to the town's "busy ambience" and the saying "as busy as a bee", but also allude to the demolished Bee Hole End at Turf Moor.

Beneath, the wavy, claret-coloured line is a reference to the River Brun , which runs through the settlement. The lion represents royalty, as the club was visited by Prince Albert Victor in The team have played their home games at Turf Moor since February , which replaced their original premises at Calder Vale.

The ground originally consisted of just a pitch and the first grandstand was not built until Burnley emerged as 4—1 winners, and Fred Poland netted the first league goal at the stadium.

Some of the gates were, however, broken down and many uncounted fans poured into the ground. Many supporters were also locked out, and the road from Bradford over the Moss at Colne had to be closed to traffic.

Burnley and Helmond have a small following who regularly make an overseas journey to visit each other's matches. As a result of the fall to the lower leagues and the simultaneously enlarged presence of hooliganism in English football in the s, a hooligan firm linked to Burnley was established.

It was called the " Suicide Squad " and became infamous for violent clashes with many other firms and fans in the country. The soldiers drank it with hot water to keep warm in the trenches, and the surviving soldiers later returned to the East Lancashire area with the liqueur.

Burnley's main rivals are Blackburn Rovers, with whom they contest the East Lancashire Derby , named after the region both clubs hail from.

Games between these sides from former mill towns are also known under the name "Cotton Mills derby", although not as common. Burnley are one of only five teams and were the second to have won all four professional divisions of English football, along with Wolverhampton Wanderers, Preston North End, Sheffield United and Portsmouth.

First Division Tier 1 [d]. Fourth Division Tier 4. FA Charity Shield [58]. Texaco Cup [].

Lancashire Cup nowadays for reserve teams []. The record for the most appearances in all competitions for Burnley is held by goalkeeper and one-club man Jerry Dawson , who made first team appearances between and He scored a hat-trick, but despite this, he was never called up again.

The club's largest win in league football was a 9—0 victory over Darwen in the First Division in — The club's record home attendance is 54, for a third round FA Cup match against Huddersfield Town in February It stood as the longest stretch without defeat in a single English professional league season until Arsenal bettered it in — A number of films and television programmes have included references to Burnley over the past few decades.

The club's supporters briefly appear in the Beatles feature film Help! His scarf made regular appearances on the series.

Burnley is referenced in The Inbetweeners Movie from The main characters share a bus with a group of noisy Clarets fans, much to the distaste of one of them, who stated in the scene that he dislikes the club.

He argued that live coverage would "damage and undermine attendances". From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the women's team, see Burnley F.

For the youth teams, see Burnley F. Unders and Academy. Association football club. Home colours. Away colours. Third colours. Main article: History of Burnley F.

For a statistical breakdown by season, see List of Burnley F. For the club's record in Europe, see Burnley F.

The frequently used line-up by manager Harry Potts in — Main article: Burnley F. Further information: List of Burnley F. Main article: List of Burnley F.

Burnley's strip in the inaugural season of the Football League — Note that the actual kit had long sleeves. Main article: Turf Moor.

Main article: East Lancashire derby. For honours won by Reserves and Academy teams, see Burnley F. English football portal Lancashire portal.

Retrieved 2 February Burnley Football Club. Retrieved 25 December Retrieved 2 September Retrieved 4 September Queen Anne Press.

Kick Off Championship — Sidan Press. Lancashire Telegraph. Retrieved 9 May Football Club History Database. Retrieved 8 May The Guardian.

Retrieved 25 January Retrieved 11 April Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 26 May Archived from the original on 5 February Retrieved 2 July Retrieved 10 May Retrieved 30 December These Football Times.

Retrieved 10 June Retrieved 15 June The Independent. The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times.

NBC SportsWorld. English Football League. Retrieved 26 January Retrieved 14 June BBC Sport. Retrieved 15 May Sky Sports. Retrieved 15 August Retrieved 24 July Lancs Live.

The Telegraph. Retrieved 26 April The New York Times. Retrieved 23 December Archived from the original on 6 October Retrieved 26 December Retrieved 31 August Retrieved 28 June Retrieved 18 May The Official P.

Footballers Heroes. Random House. Retrieved 16 August Retrieved 19 May National Football Museum. BBC News. Retrieved 19 April Retrieved 18 June Archived from the original on 9 May Historical Football Kits.

Retrieved 24 January Retrieved 1 July Retrieved 19 June The Beautiful History. Retrieved 10 September Archived from the original on 9 March Retrieved 11 August Premier League.

Retrieved 16 June European Football Statistics. Burnley Express. Retrieved 24 April Milo Books. Retrieved 2 January The mountains of the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau contains pockets of high-altitude wetlands.

The extraction of peat from the Somerset Levels began during the Roman times and has been carried out since the Levels were first drained.

These produced naphtha on a commercial scale from the high-quality local peat. Fenn's, Whixall and Bettisfield Mosses is an element of a post- Ice Age peat bog that straddles the England— Wales border and contains many rare plant and animal species due to the acidic environment created by the peat.

Industrial extraction of peat occurred at the Thorne Moor site, outside Doncaster near to the village of Hatfield.

Government policy incentivised commercial removal to peat for agricultural use. This caused much destruction of the area during the s.

The removal of the peat resulted in later flooding further downstream at Goole due to the loss of water retaining peatlands.

In Northern Ireland , there is small-scale domestic turf cutting in rural areas, but areas of bogs have been diminished because of changes in agriculture.

In response, afforestation has seen the establishment of tentative steps towards conservation such as Peatlands Park , County Armagh which is an Area of Special Scientific Interest.

Some Scotch whisky distilleries, such as those on Islay , use peat fires to dry malted barley. The drying process takes about 30 hours.

This gives the whiskies a distinctive smoky flavour, often called "peatiness". Normal Highland whiskies have a peat level of up to 30 ppm, and the whiskies on Islay usually have up to 50 ppm.

In rare types like the Octomore , [54] the whisky can have more than ppm of phenol. Scotch Ales can also use peat roasted malt, imparting a similar smoked flavor.

Canada is the world biggest exporter of peat. In Sweden, farmers use dried peat to absorb excrement from cattle that are wintered indoors.

The most important property of peat is retaining moisture in container soil when it is dry while preventing the excess of water from killing roots when it is wet.

However, it is recommended to treat peat thermally, e. Peat is sometimes used in freshwater aquaria. It is seen most commonly in soft water or blackwater river systems such as those mimicking the Amazon River basin.

In addition to being soft in texture and therefore suitable for demersal bottom-dwelling species such as Corydoras catfish, peat is reported to have a number of other beneficial functions in freshwater aquaria.

It softens water by acting as an ion exchanger ; it also contains substances that are beneficial for plants, and for the reproductive health of fishes.

Peat can prevent algae growth and kill microorganisms. Peat often stains the water yellow or brown due to the leaching of tannins.

Peat is used in water filtration, such as for the treatment of septic tank effluent and for urban runoff. Peat is widely used in balneotherapy the use of bathing to treat disease.

Many traditional spa treatments include peat as part of peloids. Such health treatments have an enduring tradition in European countries including Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, and Austria.

Some of these old spas date back to the 18th century and are still active today. The most common types of peat application in balneotherapy are peat muds , poultices , and suspension baths.

Authors Rydin and Jeglum in Biology of Habitats described the concept of peat archives, a phrase coined by influential peatland scientist Harry Godwin in In a peat profile there is a fossilized record of changes over time in the vegetation, pollen, spores, animals from microscopic to the giant elk , and archaeological remains that have been deposited in place, as well as pollen, spores and particles brought in by wind and weather.

These remains are collectively termed the peat archives. In Quaternary Palaeoecology , first published in , Birks and Birks described how paleoecological studies "of peat can be used to reveal what plant communities were present locally and regionally , what time period each community occupied, how environmental conditions changed, and how the environment affected the ecosystem in that time and place.

Scientists continue to compare modern mercury Hg accumulation rates in bogs with historical natural-archives records in peat bogs and lake sediments to estimate the potential human impacts on the biogeochemical cycle of mercury, for example.

She is believed to have lived during the late 3rd century BC and was ultimately a ritual sacrifice. Peat "hags" are a form of erosion that occurs at the sides of gullies that cut into the peat or, sometimes, in isolation.

Once the peat is exposed in these ways, it is prone to further erosion by wind, water, and livestock. The result is overhanging vegetation and peat.

Hags are too steep and unstable for vegetation to establish itself, so they continue to erode unless restorative action is taken.

The distinctive ecological conditions of peat wetlands provide a habitat for distinctive fauna and flora. For example, whooping cranes nest in North American peatlands, while Siberian cranes nest in the West Siberian peatland.

Such habitats also have many species of wild orchids and carnivorous plants. It takes centuries for a peat bog to recover from disturbance.

For more on biological communities, see wetland , bog or fen. The world's largest peat bog is located in Western Siberia.

It is the size of France and Germany combined. As the permafrost melts, it could release billions of tonnes of methane gas into the atmosphere.

The peatlands' contribution to long-term fluctuations in these atmospheric gases has been a matter of considerable debate. One of the characteristics for peat is the bioaccumulations of metals often concentrated in the peat.

Accumulated mercury is of significant environmental concern. Large areas of organic wetland peat soils are currently drained for agriculture, forestry, and peat extraction.

This process is taking place all over the world. This not only destroys the habitat of many species but also heavily fuels climate change. It decomposes and turns into carbon dioxide CO 2 , which is released into the atmosphere.

This increase has particularly taken place in developing countries, of which Indonesia, China, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea are the fastest-growing top emitters.

Peat has a high carbon content and can burn under low moisture conditions. Once ignited by the presence of a heat source e.

These smouldering fires can burn undetected for very long periods of time months, years, and even centuries propagating in a creeping fashion through the underground peat layer.

Despite the damage that the burning of raw peat can cause, bogs are naturally subject to wildfires and depend on the wildfires to keep woody competition from lowering the water table and shading out many bog plants.

Several families of plants including the carnivorous Sarracenia trumpet pitcher , Dionaea Venus flytrap , Utricularia bladderworts and non-carnivorous plants such as the sandhills lily , toothache grass and many species of orchid are now threatened and in some cases endangered from the combined forces of human drainage, negligence, and absence of fire.

It is estimated that in , peat and forest fires in Indonesia released between 0. These fires may be responsible for the acceleration in the increase in carbon dioxide levels since In North America, peat fires can occur during severe droughts throughout their occurrence, from boreal forests in Canada to swamps and fens in the subtropical southern Florida Everglades.

The situation remained critical until the end of August In June , despite some forest fire prevention methods being put in place, peat fires [84] in the arctic emitted 50 megatonnes of CO2, which is equal to Sweden's total annual emissions.

The aim of this publication is to develop mechanisms that can balance the conflicting demands on the global peatland heritage, to ensure its wise use to meet the needs of humankind.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Accumulation of partially decayed vegetation. Not to be confused with peat moss , a plant from which peat often forms.

For other uses, see Peat disambiguation. This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. See also: Peat energy in Finland. See also: Slash and burn and Arctic methane release.

Wetlands portal. Totnes, Devon. Tree plantations within the context of ecological restoration of peatlands: practical guide PDF Report. Retrieved 22 February Retrieved Sphagnum; the biology of a habitat manipulator.

Sicklebrook publishing, Sheffield, U. Wetland Ecology: Principles and Conservation 2nd edition. Chapter 1. Quarterly Review of Biology.

Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Archived from the original PDF on Retrieved 25 October Retrieved on Cambridge University Press, UK.

Chapter 7. There are also renewable sources, including wood, plants, dung, falling water, geothermal sources, solar, tidal, wind, and wave energy, as well as human and animal muscle-power.

Nuclear reactors that produce their own fuel "breeders" and eventually fusion reactors are also in this category.

Sphagnum: the biology of a habitat manipulator. Sicklebrook Press. Halsey and B. The Mackenzie River basin.

Fraser and P. Keddy eds. Brosseau, David W. Beilman, Stephanie J. Global peatland dynamics since the Last Glacial Maximum.

University of Leeds. Volcano Wood Fuels. World Energy Council. Nature Sustainability. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management.

Archived from the original on June 18, Retrieved August 9, World Energy Council Russian Geographical Society.

August 10, Mires and peatlands of Europe. Schweizerbart Science Publishers, Stuttgart, Germany. Chapter "Netherlands".

Sea of Land, The polder as an experimental atlas of Dutch landscape architecture. Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek.

Retrieved 4 February Global Ecology and Conservation. Somerset County Council. September Archived from the original PDF on 10 March Retrieved 30 November Archived from the original on NI Environment Agency.

Once the peat is exposed in these ways, it is prone to further erosion by wind, water, and livestock. Archived from the original PDF on In communities with drought problems, watering of lawns may be restricted to certain times of day or days of click the following article week. Grasses may be annual or perennial herbs, [17] : 10 generally with the following characteristics the image gallery can be used for reference : The stems of grasses, called culmsare usually cylindrical more rarely flattened, but not 3-angled and are hollow, plugged https://appscribe.co/casino-online-list/feigenbutz-boxkampf.php the nodeswhere the leaves are attached. Wildland fires and the environment: a global synthesis. Retrieved 26 May Industrial extraction of peat occurred at the Thorne Moor site, outside Doncaster near to the village of Hatfield. In the early years, various kit designs and colours were used by Burnley. Their economic Gewinner Lotto stems from several areas, confirm. Beste Spielothek in AnstoРЇ finden absolutely food production, industry, and lawns. The club's record home attendance is 54, for a third round FA Cup match against Huddersfield Town in February Kommasetzung bei bitte. Image credits. Neue Wörter flexi-schooling. Aus Cambridge English Corpus. Herkunft und Funktion des Go here.

Oryza sativa , Kerala , India. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Grasses. For other uses, see Grass disambiguation.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Family of flowering plants commonly known as grasses. This section needs additional citations for verification.

Main article: Lawn. See also: Turf management and Sand-based athletic fields. Main article: Golf course.

Main article: Grass court. A grass flower head meadow foxtail showing the plain-coloured flowers with large anthers.

National Science Review. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. Archived from the original PDF on Retrieved October Archived from the original on Archived from the original on 23 March Retrieved 20 March Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations.

Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. Retrieved 5 June New Phytologist. Bibcode : Sci Nature Communications. Bibcode : NatCo Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution.

Geological Society of America Bulletin. Grasses of the British Isles. London, U. Genera Graminum: Grasses of the world.

London: Royal Botanic Garden, Kew. Australian Journal of Entomology. The Living Planet. British Broadcasting Corporation.

Archived from the original on 11 September Retrieved 22 April Grasslands and Tundra. Planet Earth. Time Life Books.

The Field Guide to Geology. Infobase Publishing. Journal of Systematics and Evolution. Carol J. Mills ed. Understanding Biology 3rd ed.

Lindstrom, Hugh Bartling, Suburban sprawl: culture, theory, and politics , p. Moseley, David A. School of Chemistry, University of Bristol.

Cereals and pseudocereals. Einkorn Emmer Spelt. Buckwheat Tartary buckwheat. Grasses Poaceae or Gramineae.

Bambusoideae bamboos Oryzoideae Pooideae. Bamboo scaffolding Sod roof Thatching. Lawn Ornamental grass Pasture Turf. Bamboo musical instruments Bamboo textiles Switchgrass.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read View source View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Wikimedia Commons Wikispecies.

Download as PDF Printable version. Flowering head of meadow foxtail Alopecurus pratensis , with stamens exerted at anthesis.

Poaceae Barnhart [2]. Poa L. Chloridoideae Danthonioideae Micrairoideae Arundinoideae Panicoideae Aristidoideae Oryzoideae Pooideae Puelioideae Pharoideae Anomochlooideae 4.

Augustine grass Zoysia. Ornamental grasses Horticultural Calamagrostis spp. Cortaderia spp. Deschampsia spp.

Festuca spp. Melica spp. Muhlenbergia spp. Stipa spp. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Poaceae. Wikispecies has information related to Poaceae.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Grass. Polygonaceae Buckwheat Tartary buckwheat. Amaranth A.

BOP clade. Landscapes covered in peat are home to specific kinds of plants including Sphagnum moss, ericaceous shrubs, and sedges see bog for more information on this aspect of peat.

Because organic matter accumulates over thousands of years, peat deposits provide records of past vegetation and climate by preserving plant remains, such as pollen.

This allows the reconstruction of past environments and study changes in land use. Peat is harvested as a source of fuel in certain parts of the world.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC classifies peat as neither a fossil fuel nor a renewable fuel, and notes that its emission characteristics are similar to fossil fuels.

Peat forms when plant material does not fully decay in acidic and anaerobic conditions. It is composed mainly of wetland vegetation: principally bog plants including mosses , sedges, and shrubs.

As it accumulates, the peat holds water. This slowly creates wetter conditions that allow the area of wetland to expand.

Peatland features can include ponds, ridges, and raised bogs. For example, Sphagnum mosses actively secrete tannins, which preserve organic material.

Sphagnum also have special water retaining cells, known as Hyaline cells, which can release water ensuring the bogland remains constantly wet which helps promote peat production.

Most modern peat bogs formed 12, years ago in high latitudes after the glaciers retreated at the end of the last ice age. Peat material is either fibric, hemic, or sapric.

Fibric peats are the least decomposed and consist of intact fibre. Hemic peats are partially decomposed and sapric are the most decomposed.

Phragmites peat are composed of reed grass, Phragmites australis , and other grasses. It is denser than many other types of peat.

Engineers may describe a soil as peat which has a relatively high percentage of organic material. This soil is problematic because it exhibits poor consolidation properties — it cannot be easily compacted to serve as a stable foundation to support loads, such as roads or buildings.

In a widely cited article, Joosten and Clarke defined peatlands or mires which they claim are the same [Notes 1] [1] as,.

These ecosystems are characterized by the unique ability to accumulate and store dead organic matter from Sphagnum and many other non-moss species, as peat, under conditions of almost permanent water saturation.

Peatlands are adapted to the extreme conditions of high water and low oxygen content, of toxic elements and low availability of plant nutrients.

Their water chemistry varies from alkaline to acidic. Peatlands occur on all continents, from the tropical to boreal and Arctic zones from sea level to high alpine conditions.

A more recent estimate from an improved global peatland map, PEATMAP, [21] based on a meta-analysis of geospatial information at global, regional and national levels puts global coverage slightly higher than earlier peatland inventories at 4.

Peat deposits are found in many places around the world, including northern Europe and North America. Indonesia has more tropical peatlands and mangrove forests than any other nation on earth, but Indonesia is losing wetlands by , hectares , acres per year.

Under pressure, water is forced out of peat, which is soft and easily compressed, and once dry can be used as fuel. In many countries, including Ireland and Scotland , peat has traditionally been used for cooking and domestic heating, and peat is stacked to dry in rural areas.

It remains harvested on an industrial scale for this purpose in countries such as Ireland and Finland. Its insulating properties make it useful in industry.

Although humans have many uses for peat, it presents severe problems at times. Wet or dry, it can be a major fire hazard.

Peat fires may burn for great lengths of time, or smoulder underground and reignite after winter if an oxygen source is present. Because they are easily compressed under minimal weight, peat deposits pose major difficulties to builders of structures, roads, and railways.

When the West Highland railway line was built across Rannoch Moor in western Scotland, its builders had to float the tracks on a multi-thousand-ton mattress of tree roots, brushwood, earth and ash.

In the UK, more than 28 million people use drinking water from water sources which rely on peatlands. In the Bronze and Iron Ages, people used peat bogs for rituals to nature gods and spirits.

They are almost perfectly preserved by the tanning properties of the acidic water see Tollund Man for one of the most famous examples of a bog body.

Peat wetlands also used to have a degree of metallurgical importance in the Early Middle Ages , being the primary source of bog iron used to create swords and armour [ citation needed ].

Many peat swamps along the coast of Malaysia serve as a natural means of flood mitigation, with any overflow being absorbed by the peat, provided forests are still present to prevent peat fires [ citation needed ].

The climate, geography, and environment of Finland favours bog and peat bog formation. Thus, peat is available in considerable quantities.

This abundant resource often mixed with wood at an average of 2. Peat provides around 6. Finland classifies peat as a slowly renewing biomass fuel.

Furthermore, it is a common practice to forest used peat bogs instead of giving them a chance to renew. This leads to lower levels of CO 2 storage than the original peat bog.

According to one study, increasing the average amount of wood in the fuel mixture from the current 2. That said, little effort is being made to achieve this.

The International Mire Conservation Group IMCG in urged the local and national governments of Finland to protect and conserve the remaining pristine peatland ecosystems.

This includes the cessation of drainage and peat extraction in intact mire sites and the abandoning of current and planned groundwater extraction that may affect these sites.

A proposal for a Finnish peatland management strategy was presented to the government in , after a lengthy consultation phase.

In Ireland, large-scale domestic and industrial peat usage is widespread. It processes the extracted peat into milled peat which is used in power stations [ citation needed ] and sells processed peat fuel in the form of peat briquettes which are used for domestic heating.

These are oblong bars of densely compressed, dried, and shredded peat. Peat moss is a manufactured product for use in garden cultivation.

Turf dried out peat sods is also commonly used in rural areas. Use of peat for energy production was prominent in the Soviet Union , especially in In the s, larger sections of swamps and bogs in Western Russia were drained for agricultural and mining purposes.

Drainage and excavation have lowered the surface of the peatlands. In the west of the country dikes and mills were built, creating polders so that dwelling and economic activities could continue below sea level, the first polder probably in [39] and the last one in Harvesting of peat could continue in suitable locations as the lower peat layers below current sea level became exposed.

This peat was deposited before the rise of the sea level in the Holocene. The deepest point is in the Zuidplaspolder , 6.

In , the Netherlands imported 2, million kg of peat 5. After oil shale peat is the second most mined natural resource in Estonia. Peat is extracted from around 14 thousand hectars.

The mountains of the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau contains pockets of high-altitude wetlands. The extraction of peat from the Somerset Levels began during the Roman times and has been carried out since the Levels were first drained.

These produced naphtha on a commercial scale from the high-quality local peat. Fenn's, Whixall and Bettisfield Mosses is an element of a post- Ice Age peat bog that straddles the England— Wales border and contains many rare plant and animal species due to the acidic environment created by the peat.

Industrial extraction of peat occurred at the Thorne Moor site, outside Doncaster near to the village of Hatfield.

Government policy incentivised commercial removal to peat for agricultural use. This caused much destruction of the area during the s.

The removal of the peat resulted in later flooding further downstream at Goole due to the loss of water retaining peatlands. In Northern Ireland , there is small-scale domestic turf cutting in rural areas, but areas of bogs have been diminished because of changes in agriculture.

In response, afforestation has seen the establishment of tentative steps towards conservation such as Peatlands Park , County Armagh which is an Area of Special Scientific Interest.

Some Scotch whisky distilleries, such as those on Islay , use peat fires to dry malted barley. The drying process takes about 30 hours.

This gives the whiskies a distinctive smoky flavour, often called "peatiness". Normal Highland whiskies have a peat level of up to 30 ppm, and the whiskies on Islay usually have up to 50 ppm.

In rare types like the Octomore , [54] the whisky can have more than ppm of phenol. Scotch Ales can also use peat roasted malt, imparting a similar smoked flavor.

Canada is the world biggest exporter of peat. In Sweden, farmers use dried peat to absorb excrement from cattle that are wintered indoors.

The most important property of peat is retaining moisture in container soil when it is dry while preventing the excess of water from killing roots when it is wet.

However, it is recommended to treat peat thermally, e. Peat is sometimes used in freshwater aquaria. It is seen most commonly in soft water or blackwater river systems such as those mimicking the Amazon River basin.

In addition to being soft in texture and therefore suitable for demersal bottom-dwelling species such as Corydoras catfish, peat is reported to have a number of other beneficial functions in freshwater aquaria.

It softens water by acting as an ion exchanger ; it also contains substances that are beneficial for plants, and for the reproductive health of fishes.

Peat can prevent algae growth and kill microorganisms. Peat often stains the water yellow or brown due to the leaching of tannins.

Peat is used in water filtration, such as for the treatment of septic tank effluent and for urban runoff. Peat is widely used in balneotherapy the use of bathing to treat disease.

Many traditional spa treatments include peat as part of peloids. Such health treatments have an enduring tradition in European countries including Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, and Austria.

Some of these old spas date back to the 18th century and are still active today. The most common types of peat application in balneotherapy are peat muds , poultices , and suspension baths.

Authors Rydin and Jeglum in Biology of Habitats described the concept of peat archives, a phrase coined by influential peatland scientist Harry Godwin in In a peat profile there is a fossilized record of changes over time in the vegetation, pollen, spores, animals from microscopic to the giant elk , and archaeological remains that have been deposited in place, as well as pollen, spores and particles brought in by wind and weather.

These remains are collectively termed the peat archives. In Quaternary Palaeoecology , first published in , Birks and Birks described how paleoecological studies "of peat can be used to reveal what plant communities were present locally and regionally , what time period each community occupied, how environmental conditions changed, and how the environment affected the ecosystem in that time and place.

Scientists continue to compare modern mercury Hg accumulation rates in bogs with historical natural-archives records in peat bogs and lake sediments to estimate the potential human impacts on the biogeochemical cycle of mercury, for example.

She is believed to have lived during the late 3rd century BC and was ultimately a ritual sacrifice. Peat "hags" are a form of erosion that occurs at the sides of gullies that cut into the peat or, sometimes, in isolation.

Once the peat is exposed in these ways, it is prone to further erosion by wind, water, and livestock. The result is overhanging vegetation and peat.

Hags are too steep and unstable for vegetation to establish itself, so they continue to erode unless restorative action is taken.

The distinctive ecological conditions of peat wetlands provide a habitat for distinctive fauna and flora.

For example, whooping cranes nest in North American peatlands, while Siberian cranes nest in the West Siberian peatland.

Such habitats also have many species of wild orchids and carnivorous plants. It takes centuries for a peat bog to recover from disturbance.

For more on biological communities, see wetland , bog or fen. The world's largest peat bog is located in Western Siberia.

It is the size of France and Germany combined. As the permafrost melts, it could release billions of tonnes of methane gas into the atmosphere.

The peatlands' contribution to long-term fluctuations in these atmospheric gases has been a matter of considerable debate.

One of the characteristics for peat is the bioaccumulations of metals often concentrated in the peat. Accumulated mercury is of significant environmental concern.

Large areas of organic wetland peat soils are currently drained for agriculture, forestry, and peat extraction.

This process is taking place all over the world. This not only destroys the habitat of many species but also heavily fuels climate change.

It decomposes and turns into carbon dioxide CO 2 , which is released into the atmosphere. This increase has particularly taken place in developing countries, of which Indonesia, China, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea are the fastest-growing top emitters.

Peat has a high carbon content and can burn under low moisture conditions.

Was Ist Turf Video

Was Ist Turf Rechtschreibung

Common plants. Wort und Unwort des Jahres in Österreich. Auflagen des Dudens — Klare Erklärungen von natürlichem geschriebenem und gesprochenem Englisch. Learn the words you need to communicate with confidence. Sie sind öfter hier? Export figures are good, but the click is losing sales on home click here. Folgen Sie uns. Fügen Sie turf zu einer der folgenden Listen learn more here oder erstellen Sie eine neue. Das Wort des Tages observatory. Turf is also ground cover that looks like grass :. Meine Wortlisten. Enthält Parlamentsinformationen lizenziert unter der Offenen Parlamentarischen Lizenz v3. Kontamination von Redewendungen. Was Ist Turf Der Begriff „Surf & Turf” (Brandung und Rasen) entstand der Legende nach in Steakhäusern entlang der Atlantikküste Nordamerikas in den späten er Jahren. turf Bedeutung, Definition turf: 1. the surface layer of land on which grass is growing, consisting of the grass and the soil in. Definition, Rechtschreibung, Synonyme und Grammatik von 'Turf' auf Duden online nachschlagen. Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache. Das Team aus dem Stall Godolphin, Trainer Saeed bin Suroor und Starjockey Dettori, dominiert derzeit den internationalen Turf. (Quelle: Lübecker Nachrichten. For those who can't decide if they prefer beef or fish there are many Surf 'n' Turf variation, e.g. Ranch & Sea" (beef fillet with grilled tiger prawns) or The. Grass on the fairway is mown short and even, allowing the player to link the ball cleanly. Retrieved 6 September Retrieved click at this page December European Football Statistics. Some of these old spas date back to the 18th century and are still active today. Inthe Federal Trade Commission settled a complaint with Reverb Communications, who was using interns to post favorable product reviews in Apple's iTunes store for clients. Peat forms Bild Spiele wetland conditions, where flooding or stagnant water obstructs the flow of oxygen from the atmosphere, slowing the rate of decomposition. Grasses of the British Isles. Despite the damage that the burning of raw peat can cause, bogs are naturally subject to wildfires and depend on the wildfires Was Ist Turf keep woody competition from lowering the water table and shading out many bog plants.

3 thoughts on “Was Ist Turf”

Leave a Comment